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Quilt Binding Instructions

"Fabric binding"

Here you will find step-by-step quilt binding instructions. This will help you to make an edge with out puckers and uneven edges.

Many times when we get to this point we want to rush through and have our quilt finished. Don’t rush, take your time and finish the quilt with a smooth binding and you will be happy you took the time.

You have two ways to work the quilt binding, you can buy pre made bias binding or make your own. To make your own you need to decide on straight cut or bias cut which is a more flexible binding and seems to look good over a longer period of time as opposed to straight cut. You can find how to make your own binding here.

Cutting binding

You will need to cut enough bias binding to go around your entire quilt plus a few extra inches. Cut long strips of fabric 2 1/2" wide (good size for a beginner). The excess will be cut off after you have stitched down the binding to the quilt. The 2 1/2 inches will allow for 1/4” seam allowance on each side.

Some people find it very handy to fold the bias binding in have and press with a steam iron. Now press 1/4” on the long raw edge to make a channel for your sewing on the backside.

Stitch binding

As in (Fig 1) you can start sewing at the top side but it is ok to start on any side (NOT at a corner). Place the raw edge of the strip of bias lined even with the edge of the quilt. Start sewing about an inch or two from the beginning of the binding, sew all of the layers together with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.

When you get to the corners you will want to miter them, it is not as hard as you think. The mitered corners add a nice finish around the edge of the three layers. (Fig 2) Mark the point at 1/4" from the corner. When you get to this point, stop sewing (do NOT go past it!). It is a good idea to take one or two back stitches and then go forward again to that point.

(Fig 3) DO NOT CUT BINDING

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Fold the binding back (so it forms a backwards L from the edge of the quilt). The binding will make a perfect 45 degree angle in the corner. Hold the binding in place and fold it forward, so it matches the edge of the next side of the quilt

(Fig 4) Keep that angle and the fold in the quilt binding. It should be even with the first edge. Now start sewing again in the same spot you left off - 1/4" from both edges in the corner. Continue until you ALMOST reach your starting spot. Trim off the excess quilt binding so that you only have a couple of inches overlap. Tuck the end binding under the beginning binding. Turn the beginning binding edge under 1/2 inch and pin down, lining up the edges. Finish stitching along the quilt edge.

Back of quilt binding

Fold the binding over the edge of the quilt, turn the quilt as you will now be working on the back side. You can use pins, bobby pins, hair clips or anything you have to hold the binding in place. Usually space the pins or clips about 4 or 5 inches apart, just to hold the quilt binding while you sew.

Hand sew the binding to the back of the quilt, keeping your stitches hidden behind and inside the binding using the color thread to match the binding, and a blind stitch. It's a little time consuming, but it looks much nicer. You can sew the binding down using a sewing machine and staying about 1/8 of an inch on the edge but I just prefer the hidden stitches from hand sewing. No fast rule here, just what you want to do.

Finishing the raw edge : When you flip over those mitered corners, you'll notice they make a nice miter on both sides. (Fig 2) Fold to the quilt back, just beyond the stitching line.

(Fig 3) Fold the binding over the raw edges of the quilt and hand- stitch the binding to cover the machine stitches. Hand stitch the corner miter seams closed as you go.


Quilt binding to Quilts for Beginners




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